Projekte zu Globalisierung & Kulturvergleich der Forschungsgruppe Schicktanz



2018 – 2020: Plattform für internationale Zusammenarbeit: „Bioethics and the Legacy of the Holocaust“

Bearbeitet von:
Prof. Dr. Silke Schicktanz sschick(at)gwdg.de (Projektleitung)
PD Dr. Heiko Stoff stoff.heiko(at)mh-hannover.de (Projektleitung)

Ansprechpartnerin:
Prof. Dr. Silke Schicktanz sschick(at)gwdg.de
Förderung: Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF)
Laufzeit: 2018–2020

In the summer of 2017, we established an international working group which aims at jointly examining the impact and legacy of the Holocaust on the development of bioethics in Israel and Germany. Since 2018 we are government-funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). During a German-Israeli Symposium on 'Bioethics and the Legacy of the Holocaust' from May 13 until May 17, 2019 in Berlin, a theoretical framework for interdisciplinary studies by addressing methodological and conceptual questions was introduced. Selected junior career researchers from Germany and Israel had been actively enrolled in this transnational and cross-cultural symposium with extensive exchange on existing, ongoing, and envisioned studies. They now cover our network with different disciplinary backgrounds, such as history of science and medicine, bioethics, public health ethics and cultural studies as well as technology studies (STS).

The main research question is whether and how the concept, discipline, and debates of current bioethics and related practices in Israel and Germany have been influenced by historical memories. In particular this includes ethical guidelines, committees, counseling, public priorities, ethico-legal developments, as well as research and health policies. Also the impact of the so-called Nuremberg Code, and by this the US debate on 'historical lessons', on current bioethics are part of the reflection. While many studies have a focus on local debates, our research has a particularly strong interest in transnational and cross-cultural exchanges of and between such debates. By bringing together bioethicists and historians, we want to contribute to future debates in the broader field of medical humanities, a field comprising the various disciplines (historical, ethical, cultural, and sociological) by reflecting on the relationship between medical history, ethical debates and current medical practices.

Assor, Yael, M.A., University of California, U.S.A.
Boas, Hagai, PhD, Van Leer Jerusalem Institute, Israel
Czech, Herwig, Dr., Charité Berlin, Germany
Davidovitch, Nadav, Prof. PhD. University of the Negev, Israel
Foth, Hannes, M.A., University of Lübeck, Germany
Hashiloni-Dolev, Yael, Prof. PhD. Academic College of Tel Aviv-Yaffo, Israel
Hohendorf, Gerrit, Prof. Dr. med., Technical University of Munich (TUM), Germany
Krischel, Matthis, Dr., Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany
Schicktanz, Silke, Prof. Dr., University Medical Centre Göttingen, Germany
Schütz, Mathias, Dr., Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany
Stoff, Heiko, PD Dr., Hannover Medical School, Germany
Zalashik, Rakefet, Prof. PhD, Vanderbilt University, U.S.A.
Zuckerman, Shachar, PhD, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

This collaboration aims at developing a larger, continuous platform encouraging joint research and publications. Currently we are planning a special issue for the journal BIOETHICS. This is expected to be published in autumn 2020.

The issue will provide an innovative theoretical framework for future interdisciplinary studies on the historization and cultural self-reflection of bioethics by addressing methodological and conceptual questions. The topics selected will cover all the main relevant aspects of the debate and can be organized in three sections:

  • The general conceptual and meta-ethical issues of the relationship between ethics and the history of medicine
  • The impact of historical references on current bioethical debates on genetics and reproduction medicine, end of life decisions, and research ethics
  • The political and public usage of explicit and implicit analogies for justifying or criticizing public health policies

ARE YOU INTERESTED IN BECOMING A MEMBER OF OUR PLATFORM?

We are looking for researchers from post-doc level onwards whose work is situated within the intersection of:

  • Bioethics with a focus on the impact of medical history of the first half of the 20th century on current debates
  • Theoretical, philosophical, or didactical concepts of historical responsibility in the areas of teaching history and ethics of medicine
  • Contemporary historical studies on how the Holocaust – 'Nazi medicine' – of the first half of the 20th century impact current health policy
  • Cultural-comparative approaches on health policy/biopolicy considering historical developments
  • Social studies of public or health professional attitudes/narratives related to the Holocaust, 'Nazi medicine', or bio-selective technologies in immigration politics

Should you be interested in joining our collaboration or have any questions, please contact us:

PD Dr. Heiko Stoff
+49 511-532-2984
stoff.heiko(at)mh-hannover.de

Prof. Dr. Silke Schicktanz
+49(0)551-39 33966
sschick(at)gwdg.de


2016 – 2019: Forschungsprojekt: „Timing Fertility - Eine vergleichende Analyse des Zusammenhangs von Zeitkonstruktionen und ‚Social Freezing’ in Deutschland und Israel“

Bearbeitet von:
Dr. Nitzan Rimon-Zarfaty (PI)
Lisa-Katharina Sismuth

Ansprechpartnerinnen:
Prof. Dr. Silke Schicktanz sschick(at)gwdg.de
Dr. Nitzan Rimon-Zarfaty nitzan.rimon-zarfaty(at)medizin.uni-goettingen.de

Phase I: August 2016 – Januar 2018 
Finanzierung: Minerva-Stiftung; Post-Doctoral Fellowship 

Phase II: February 2018 – September 2019
Finanzierung: The Marie Sklodowska-Curie Individual-Fellowship (EU)

Durch den technischen Fortschritt wurde das “Freezing” von Keimzellen in der Reproduktionsmedizin möglich: Frauen haben die Möglichkeit, ihre Eizellen zu kryokonservieren, um ihre Fruchtbarkeit zu verlängern. Dieses Verfahren ist bekannt als sog. “social egg freezing“ (SEF). Es hat sowohl eine bioethische als auch eine öffentliche Debatte über soziale und ethische Implikationen ausgelöst. Die sozio-empirische Untersuchung dieses Forschungsprojektes analysiert das “Freezing“ in einem breiteren Zusammenhang. Dies geschieht aus der Perspektive einer “Soziologie der Zeit”.

SEF ist eine Technologie, die es Frauen ermöglicht, sich unabhängig von ihrer biologischen Grenze zu reproduzieren. In Hinblick auf diese biographische Perspektive ist das Einfrieren von Eizellen ein interessantes Paradigma. An ihm lässt sich zeigen, wie die modernen Lebenswissenschaften Konzepte von Zeit, Zeitpunkten und Planung beeinflussen können (beispielsweise im Zusammenhang mit Entscheidungen, die die Familie und Reproduktion betreffen, sowie die arbeitsbedingte Einteilung der eigenen Zeit).

Die Untersuchung zielt darauf ab, das Wechselspiel zwischen Kultur und Bioethik in einer interdisziplinären und empirischen Weise zu untersuchen. Der Fokus liegt dabei auf einer doppelt-vergleichenden Analyse: Experten- und Laienperspektiven einerseits, sowie ein Kulturvergleich zwischen Deutschland und Israel andererseits. Dieser interkulturelle Vergleich ist vor allem interessant, weil der deutsche Regulierungs- und Rechtsrahmen bzgl. neuer Reproduktionstechnologien eher restriktiv ist, wohingegen sich die israelische Regelung als extrem permissiv gezeigt hat. 

Das Projekt beinhaltet zwei empirische Hauptphasen

Phase 1:  August 2016 bis Januar 2018: qualitative halb-strukturierte Interviews mit deutschen und israelischen Experten sowie eine Archiv-Analyse für die Schaffung eines interkulturellen Forschungsrahmens. 

Phase 2: February 2018- September 2019: qualitative, halb-strukturierte Interviews mit Nutzern des “social egg freezing” und die Analyse ihrer Internetforen.

Forschungsziele

(a) Detaillierte empirische Analyse von Zeit im Zusammenhang mit der Reproduktionsmedizin 

(b) Eine doppelt-vergleichende Analyse des “social egg freezing” durch zwei Kulturen sowie Experten und Laien

(c) Theoretisierung der zeitlichen Dimensionen von Zusammenhängen zwischen Reproduktion, Arbeit und Geschlecht

Rimon-Zarfaty, N. and Schweda, M. (2019). Biological clocks, biographical schedules and generational cycles: Temporality in the ethics of assisted reproduction. Bioethica Forum, 11(4): 133-141.

  • June 2019: “Freezing for the fourth and fifth child”- The usage of social egg freezing among Israeli Jewish religious women- An intracultural perspective. Experts Symposium: Comparative and transnational perspectives on technologies of fertility preservation and extension; DMU, Leicester, UK (Invited Talk).
  • May 2019: Reproductive temporalities –A comparative analysis of time constructions among social egg freezing users in Germany and Israel. Workshop: Bioethics and Human Temporality; Oldenburg, Germany (a self-organized workshop).
  • October 2018: TIMING FERTILITY- A comparative analysis of time constructions and the social practice of egg-freezing in Germany and Israel. Stakeholders‘ conference: Social Egg Freezing-  the practice and its implications (a self-organized conference).
  • September 2018: Reproductive temporalities, gender and clinical labor–Experts’ debates on social egg-freezing in Germany and Israel. The 39th Congress of the German Sociological Association, the Georg-August-University of Göttingen, Germany (cfp).
  • July 2018: The Medicalization of reproduction, reproductive timing and the labor market- The Israeli experts’ Debate on social egg-freezing. The 19th ISA world congress, Toronto, Canada (cfp-DP).
  • June 2018: Reproductive temporalities, late motherhood and the social practice of egg freezing in Germany and Israel. The ESHMS 17th Biennial Conference, Lisbon, Portugal (cfp).
  • June 2018: Reproductive temporalities – Experts’ debates on social egg-freezing in Germany and Israel. Colloquia: Institute of History, Theory and Ethics of Medicine, University Medical Center Mainz, Germany (Invited talk).
  • February 2018: Social egg freezing and reproductive temporalities – A comparative study of experts’ debates in Germany and Israel. Colloquia: The Institute of Medical History and Science Research, Lübeck University, Germany (Invited talk).
  • October 2017: Reproductive Timing: A comparative analysis of temporality constructions and the social practice of egg freezing in Germany and Israel. Paper presented at the conference: Frozen: Social and Bioethical Aspects of Cryo-Fertility, Tel-Aviv, Israel (cfp).
  • April 2017: The Construction of Time, Timing and Planning: A comparative case study of the social practice of egg freezing in Germany and Israel. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Minerva Stiftung Fellowship Program- as the representor of fellowships’ holders, the Max Planck Society, Munich, Germany (Invited talk).
  • March 2017: TIMING FERTILITY- A Gender Sensitive Analysis of Time Constructions and the Social Practice of Egg-Freezing in Israel.  Paper presented at the conference: Politiken der Reproduktion – Politics of Reproduction, Hannover, Germany (cfp).
  • January 2017: The construction of time, timing and planning- a comparative case study of the social practice of egg freezing in Germany and Israel. Paper presented at the Department of Medical Ethics and History of Medicine Colloquium, University Medical Center Goettingen, Germany (Invited talk).
  • May 2019: Bioethics and Human Temporality: Perspectives from the Beginning, Middle and End of Life- An international, interdisciplinary workshop; Oldenburg, Germany (Co-organizer: Prof. Dr. Mark Schweda).
  • October 2018: Stakeholders’ Conference: Social Egg Freezing. Stakeholders’ perspectives on the practice and its implications; Tel Aviv, Israel.

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 749889.


2014 – 2017: Forschungsprojekt: „'Wunschkinder' in Deutschland und Indien als Kontext für Pränataldiagnostik und selektive Abtreibungen“

Bearbeitet von:
Dr. Sheela Saravanan
Julia Perry, M.A. jperry(at)gwdg.de

Ansprechpartnerin:
Prof. Dr. Silke Schicktanz sschick(at)gwdg.de
Förderung: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)
Laufzeit: 2014–2017

Reproductive technologies such as prenatal diagnosis (PND) and In-vitro Fertilization (IVF) offer a plethora of possibilities for individuals to plan their family. Some of these possibilities include surrogacy, egg/sperm donation and selective abortions. However, differential socio-cultural conditions and legal guidelines have led to individuals either carving out desired possibilities in the existing cultural context and/or seeking transnational reproductive health care services. These activities redefine the concept of global health care and opens up contested avenues in which the use of reproductive technologies in the backdrop of individual and collective socio-cultural notions of desires, infertility, religion and kinship are in interface with legal regulations, health care services and medical ethics discourses. The projects on reproductive technologies features the ethical discourse of the growing global use of these technologies and the socio-ethical and regulatory challenges that it has posed in Europe and Asia.

Pränatale und Präimplantationsdiagnostik ermöglicht es, dass Menschen ihre Wunschkinder nach genetischen Eigenschaften auswählen, so wie Geschlecht und Behinderung. Bekannte Gründe für solche selektiven Abtreibungen sind Attribute wie (un-) erwünschtes Geschlecht, sensorische, kognitive oder körperliche Beeinträchtigungen oder gewünschte genetische Eigenschaften. Ethische Stimmen und die Geschlechts- / Behinderungen- Rechtsbewegung weltweit haben Bedenken, dass pränatales Screening um Attribute von Kindern aufgrund von Geschlecht, Krankheit oder Behinderung auszuwählen, moralisch problematisch ist, weil es Vorurteile verkörpert und verstärkt und eine verletzende Nachricht an Menschen mit diesen Attributen sendet. Das Ziel dieser Studie ist, individuelle durch soziale Erfahrungen geprägte Vorstellungen von einem Wunschkind (Wunschkinder/Vansh) die zu selektiven Abtreibungen führen im deutschen und indischen Kontext zu untersuchen. Die Forschung stützt sich konzeptionell auf die Arbeiten von Mead 1962, symbolischer Interaktionismus zwischen dem Selbst und dem generalisierten Anderen, Lindemann 1996, Kessler und McKenna 1978, Geschlecht und Behinderung als soziales Konstrukt im Kontext von Körper und Leib in der Gestaltung des Begriffs Wunschinder. Diese Studie nutzt die methodischen Ansätze Garfinkels, (1967) Phänomenologie in der Ethnomethodologie, da sie Einblicke in individuelles Verhalten / Gedanken und Formen der sozialen Organisation geben. Qualitative Methodik von Tiefeninterviews wird in klinischen und Familien- Kontexten in Deutschland und Indien mit Müttern und Angehörigen eingesetzt werden, und strukturierte Interviews werden mit Ärzten und Personal von Forschungseinrichtungen und ausgewählten staatlichen Programmen durchgeführt werden. Dies wird konzeptionell und methodisch das Wissen zu den oben angegebenen Theorien und Forschungsmethoden ergänzen. Die interkulturelle Analyse ist ein wesentlicher Aspekt dieser Studie, weil sie tiefere Lebensmechanismen, die in unterschiedlichen kulturellen Rahmenbedingungen eingebettet sind, ans Licht bringen soll. Der Begriff der Wunschkinder in Deutschland und Indien wurde bisher nicht untersucht, somit ist das Ziel dieser Studie diese Lücke zu schließen und in einer einzigartigen Weise einen Beitrag zu den laufenden sozio-ethischen Debatten über pränatales Screening und selektive Abtreibungen zu leisten.

Prof. Tulsi Patel
Delhi School of Economics
University of Delhi

Prof. Dr. med. Günter Emons and Frau Dr. med. Barbara Felke 
Die Universitätsfrauenklinik Göttingen. 
Robert-Koch-Str. 40, 37075 Göttingen
(http://wwwuser.gwdg.de/~ukfh/UFK/perinatalzentrum.html)


2014 – 2016: Forschungsprojekt: „Contested Avenues of Reproductive Technologies: A Study of Transnational Transfers and Cross-cultural Practices“

Bearbeitet von:
Prof. Dr. Silke Schicktanz (Leiterin des deutschen Forschungsteams)
Prof. Dr. Tulsi Patel (Leiterin des israelischen Forschungsteams)
Dr. Sheela Saravanan
Dr. Sayani Mitra
Ms. Garima Yadav

Ansprechpartnerin:
Prof. Dr. Silke Schicktanz sschick(at)gwdg.de
Förderung: Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD) und University Grants Commission, India
Laufzeit: 2014–2016

Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) such as prenatal diagnosis (PND) and In-vitro Fertilization (IVF) offer a plethora of possibilities for individuals to plan their family. Some of these possibilities include; surrogacy, selective abortions. However, differential socio-cultural conditions and legal guidelines have led to individuals either carving out desired possibilities based on the existing cultural context and/or seeking transnational reproductive health care services. This study aims to explore in a German-Indian context, how these assisted reproductive technologies redefine global health care and open up contested avenues in which individual and collective socio-cultural notions of desires, infertility, religion and kinship are in interface with legal regulations, health care services and medical ethics discourses. The proposed project is a significant contribution to the ethical discourse of the growing global use of assisted reproductive technologies and the socio-ethical and regulatory challenges that it has posed. The aim of the project is to strengthen network based on the common research interests through sharing information, guiding students, joint publications and to evolve into a larger Indo-German socio-ethical project on genomics and reproductive technologies.


2010 – 2015: DFG Graduiertenkolleg: „Dynamiken von Raum und Geschlecht“ (Universität Göttingen & Universität Kassel)

Bearbeitet von:
Dr. Solveig Lena Hansen shansen(at)gwdg.de

Ansprechpartnerin:
Prof. Dr. Silke Schicktanz sschick(at)gwdg.de
Förderung: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)
Laufzeit:2010–2015

Projektinformationen auf der Website der DFG

Das interdisziplinäre Graduiertenkolleg verfolgt das Ziel, die wechselseitigen Bezüge von Raum- und Geschlechterkonstitutionen in aktuellen und historischen Gesellschaften inner- und außerhalb Europas zu untersuchen: doing space while doing gender. Das Graduiertenkolleg wird die expliziten wie impliziten geschlechterspezifischen Dimensionen in der Konstitution von Räumen sowie in den Erfahrungen mit Räumen untersuchen.

Ausgangspunkt ist der Befund, dass viele neuere Forschungen zum Raum die Kategorie Geschlecht desto weniger berücksichtigen, je globaler die Ebene der Betrachtung ist. Der Untertitel des Graduiertenkollegs verweist auf den Konstruktionscharakter des Raum- und Genderbegriffs (entdecken, erfinden), betont das Imaginäre, das diesen Begriffen in der Literatur wie in der sozialen Welt anhaftet (erfinden, erzählen), und verdeutlicht schließlich den Aspekt von Machtbeziehungen und Herrschaft (entdecken, erobern).

Aus soziologischer, ethnologischer, literaturwissenschaftlicher und historischer Sicht sollen vier Schwerpunkte im Themenfeld Raum und Geschlecht in den Mittelpunkt gerückt werden: Dimensionen des Theoretischen als gemeinsame Grundlage sowie die drei Untersuchungsfelder Dimensionen der Verkörperung, Dimensionen der Verortung und Dimensionen der Verflechtung.

Das Qualifizierungskonzept legt besonderes Gewicht auf interdisziplinäre Zusammenarbeit im Sinne eines permanenten Lernprozesses. In regelmäßigen Kolloquien und Workshops sowie im Rahmen eines Programms für Gastwissenschaftlerinnen und Gastwissenschaftler werden die Verflechtungen der Dimensionen Raum und Geschlecht diskutiert. Ein begleitendes Fortbildungsprogramm in den Schlüsselqualifikationen soll die Doktorandinnen und Doktoranden darüber hinaus auf unterschiedliche berufliche Lebenswege nach der Promotion vorbereiten. Der Erfolg wird durch enge Betreuungsverträge und transparente Arbeitspläne gesichert.


2010 – 2012: Forschungsprojekt: „Kulturübergreifende Ethik der Gesundheit und Verantwortung: Experten- und Laienperspektiven auf bioethische Dilemmata in Deutschland und Israel“

Bearbeitet von:
Dr. Julia Inthorn
Dr. Nitzan Rimon-Zarfaty

Ansprechpartnerin:
Prof. Dr. Silke Schicktanz sschick(at)gwdg.de
Förderung: Deutsch-Israelische Stiftung für Wissenschaftliche Forschung und Entwicklung (GIF)
Laufzeit: 2010–2012

Zwischen Deutschland und Israel gibt es große Unterschiede im Hinblick auf die bioethischen Expertendebatten. Ein Vergleich verspricht daher Einsichten zu kulturellen Differenzen und zum Pluralismus in der moralischen Bewertung bioethischer Dilemmata. Allerdings sind auch Gemeinsamkeiten hinsichtlich bestimmter Prinzipien, moralischer Einstellungen und gesellschaftlicher Konflikte im Kontext biomedizinischer Behandlung und Forschung zu erwarten, und zwar sowohl bei israelischen und deutschen Laien als auch zwischen Laien und Betroffenen/Patienten und zwischen Laien und Experten. Diese Überschneidungen könnten eine Basis für die Entwicklung kulturübergreifender ethischer Prinzipien im Bereich der Biomedizin bieten. 

Das Forschungsprojekt "Kulturübergreifende Ethik der Gesundheit und Verantwortung: Experten- und Laienperspektiven auf bioethische Dilemmata in Deutschland und Israel" [Cross-Cultural Ethics of Health and Responsibility: Expert and lay perspectives regarding bioethical dilemmas in Germany and Israel] ergänzt die vergleichende Analyse von Expertendiskursen in Deutschland und Israel um die Erkundung der moralischen Einstellungen von Laien (einschließlich Betroffener). Dabei geht es vor allem um die Rolle der Verantwortungsverteilung bei Entscheidungen am Lebensende (z.B. Therapiebegrenzung, Patientenverfügungen, Sterbehilfe) und Gentests bei Erwachsenen. Die Methodik umfasst neben der Untersuchung von Richtlinien und bioethischen Fachdebatten auch Fokusgruppendiskussionen mit Laien unterschiedlicher Betroffenheit, Religionszugehörigkeit und Nationalität. Zentrales Forschungsinteresse ist es, neben Vorstellungen von Verantwortung, auch Hoffnungen/Befürchtungen, Rechten und Pflichten im Zusammenhang mit der Inanspruchnahme, Erwägung oder Ablehnung neuer biomedizinischer Möglichkeiten der Lebens- und Familienplanung wie Genetik und Patientenverfügungen zu analysieren und ethisch zu reflektieren. Die Ergebnisse werden außerdem auch im Hinblick auf andere wichtige Einflussfaktoren wie Religion, Gesundheits- und Krankheitskonzepte und marktwirtschaftliches Denken geprüft. 

Das Projekt ist Teil eines übergreifenden, mehrstufigen Forschungsunternehmens, das verschiedene Forschungsprojekte und Workshops umfasst. Vorangegangene Studien von Raz und Schicktanz (2009a,b) untersuchten Einstellungen von Laien (einschließlich Personen, die von genetischen Erkrankungen betroffen sind) bezüglich Gentests bei Erwachsenen. Der Schwerpunkt lag auf Unterschieden zwischen kulturellen und persönlichen Argumentationen sowie zwischen Betroffenen und Nichtbetroffenen. Im Hinblick auf die drei großen Themenkomplexe, die dabei identifiziert wurden – medizinische Technologie / technokratische Medizin, ökonomische Aspekte der Gesundheitsversorgung und persönliche Entscheidungsprozesse – ließ sich auf der kulturellen Ebene ein Gegensatz zwischen beiden Ländern nachweisen, nicht jedoch im Kontext individueller Entscheidungen oder der Belange der von genetischen Erkrankungen Betroffenen. Eine erste Analyse zeigte drei große Themenkomplexe bezüglich genetischer Verantwortung und Risiko, bei denen nationale Unterschiede eingehender zu untersuchen sind: Eigenverantwortung, Verantwortung für Angehörige, Verantwortung der Gesellschaft gegenüber ihren Mitgliedern. Im Kontext von Entscheidungen am Lebensende zeigten unsere früheren Untersuchungen, dass die israelische Politik im Vergleich zu Deutschland bei der moralischen und rechtlichen Abwägung zwischen dem Selbstbestimmungsrecht des Patienten und der Pflichten der Ärzte restriktiver ist, beispielsweise wenn es um die Unterlassung oder den Abbruch medizinischer Behandlung am Lebensende oder die Umsetzung von Patientenverfügungen geht (Schicktanz, Raz, and Shalev, 2010).

„Kultur und Ethik der Biomedizin“, November/Dezember 2009, Vortragsreihe der Universitätsmedizin Göttingen.
Das Programm der Vortragsreihe finden Sie hier (PDF)

„Genetics and Society: Practices/Positions, Expert/Public Discourses", BGU, Dezember 2008. Die Arbeit dieses Workshops wurde in einem speziellen Band der Zeitschrift New Genetics and Society (mit herausgegeben von Raz und Schicktanz, 2010) veröffentlicht (Link zur Website des Journals

„Der Einfluss von Religion und Kultur auf die Biomedizin - ein Deutsch-Israelischer Dialog“, November 2007, Evangelische Akademie, Berlin. 
Die Dokumentation der Tagung finden Sie hier (PDF)

Raz, A., and S. Schicktanz (2009a). Lay Perceptions of Genetic Testing in Germany and Israel. New Genetics and Society 28(4): 401-414. 

Raz, A., and S. Schicktanz (2009b). Diversity and Uniformity in Genetic Responsibility: Moral Attitudes of Patients, Relatives and Lay People in Germany and Israel. Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 12(4): 433-442. 

Raz, A., and S. Schicktanz (2010a). Through the Looking Glass: Engaging in a Socio-Ethical, Cross-Cultural Dialogue. New Genetics and Society 29(1): 55-59. 

Schicktanz, S., A. Raz, and C. Shalev (2010b). Cultural Impacts on End of Life Ethics: A Cross-Comparative Study between Germany and Israel. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics, 19,  3, 381-394. 

Schicktanz, S., Raz A. & Shalev C. (2010c) The cultural context of patient autonomy and doctors duties: Passive euthanasia and advance directives in Germany and Israel. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13(4), 363-369.

New Genetics and Society (2010), special issue: Genetics and Responsibilities: Cultural Perspectives, Public Discourses and Ethical Issues, guest editors: S. Schicktanz and A. Raz.

Medicine Studies (2012), thematic issue: Responsibility in Biomedical Practice, guest editors: S. Schicktanz and A. Raz.


2010: Workshop: „’Moving Bodies – Transforming Vlaues’: Socio-Cultural and Ethical Issues of Transnational Biomedicine“

Organisiert von:
Prof. Dr. Silke Schicktanz
Prof. Dr. Tutsi Patel
(in Zusammenarbeit mit der Max-Planck-Institut zur Erforschung multireligiöser und multiethnischer Gesellschaften)

Ansprechpartnerin:
Prof. Dr. Silke Schicktanz sschick(at)gwdg.de
Förderung: Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD)&Georg-August-Universität Göttingen – India Office (UGILO)
Laufzeit: 2010

zur externen Projekthomepage

Biomedicine and the related bioethical problems were only associated with highly industrialised, Western health care systems for a long time. Today, most non-Western or developing countries also face the implemen-tation of biomedicine on different levels – and the rise of cutural, social and ethical questions.

The workshop aims at analysing the relationship between local and global biomedical practices from a social and an ethical point of view. The connectedness and mutual dependence of cultural variety, national legal and economic frameworks and, additionally, public trust in and responsibility of the medical profession can best be highlighted and examined by a cross-cultural comparison. For this purpose, the juxtaposition of India and Germany provides an ideal setting. While in both countries, biomedical research and practise are well established, they differ in the cultural framing with regard to factors such as medical tradition, religion/secularity and gender as well as in the socio-economical background.

Within this field, special attention should be drawn to the gender dimension in biomedicine and health issues. Medical tourism, mobility of body and body parts, giving birth, ageing and health care will be discussed.

A closed workshop with sufficient time for discussion and interdisciplinary exchange is scheduled to ensure an intensive dialogue between the different disciplines.

Den Workshop-Flyer zum Download als PDF finden Sie hier (Englisch)


2007 – 2009: Forschungsprojekt: „Kultur und Ethik der Biomedizin im Deutsch-Israelischen Vergleich“

Bearbeitet von:
Prof. Dr. Silke Schicktanz

Ansprechpartnerin:
Prof. Dr. Silke Schicktanz sschick(at)gwdg.de
Förderung: 2009: Niedersächsische Ministerium für Wissenschaft und Kunst (NMWK); 2008: Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF); 2007– 2008: Deutsch-Israelische Stiftung für Wissenschaftliche Forschung und Entwicklung (GIF)
Laufzeit: 2007–2009

Das Forschungsprojekt „Kultur und Ethik der Biomedizin im Deutsch-Israelischen Vergleich“ beschäftigt sich auf Ebene des Kulturvergleichs mit der Intersektion zwischen Ethik, Sozialwissenschaften und Life Sciences.

zur ausführlichen Beschreibung des Projekts


2004 – 2007: Forschungsprojekt: „Challenges of Biomedicine –Socio-Cultural Contexts, European Governance, and Bioethics“

Bearbeitet von:
Dr. Mark Schweda

Ansprechpartnerin:
Prof. Dr. Silke Schicktanz sschick(at)gwdg.de
Förderung: European Commission, 6th Framework programme "Science and Society"
Laufzeit: 2004–2007

Kurzbeschreibung:
The socio-cultural background of modern biomedicine was examined in a comparative analysis of qualitative empirical data gathered in different European countries: Germany, France, the Netherlands, Sweden, Austria and Cyprus. Moreover, perspectives from Latvia and Great Britain were taken into account selectively. The emphasis of the project lies on the question how laypeople and patients view modern medicine and live with it. The interactions and interdependencies between medicine and culture were analysed along two main comparative axes. On a first level the countries involved were compared to trace different cultural approaches. Secondly, two different medical technologies, organ transplantation and postnatal genetic testing, were used as comparative examples. These two technologies raise different ethical and social problems and hence challenges for governance. 

On this basis, the CoB project developed conclusions and recommendations for the academic context as well as for European and national policy makers. These address questions of European harmonisation, citizen participation and governance as well as bioethical issues.

Den Bericht "Herausforderungen der Biomedizin - Empfehlungen zu soziokulturellen, ethischen und partizipatorischen Fragen" finden Sie hier (PDF, englisch)

detailliertere Informationen über das Projekt "Challanges of Biomedicine" (englisch)

Übersicht:

  • Qualitative comparative research on different socio-culturally framed ways of dealing with modern biomedicine in selected European countries
  • Investigation on how members of the public assess the impact of modern biomedical technologies on their body, identity, ways of knowing and social relations 
  • Analysis of how European citizens reflect on the socio-political consequences of modern biomedical technologies, different modes of governance as well as opportunities of public participation 
  • Investigation of the role of cultural concepts like identity and bodily integrity in the present bioethical discourse
  • Reflection and evaluation of the consequences of the cultural plurality of moral conceptions on the debate on European bioethics 
  • Recommendations for the development of ethical regulations and possibilities of governing research and practise in the field of medicine and life sciences
  • Contribution to interdisciplinary research at the interface of bioethics, social studies of science and medical anthropology
  • Advancement of qualitative comparative methods for investigating patients’ and laypeople’s attitudes towards questions of biomedicine in an international and interdisciplinary research setting
  • Development of key concepts for an intercultural bioethical discourse 
  • Establishment and structuring of a European network for the exploration of biomedicine from an ethical and sociological point of view

K. Amelang, S. Beck, V. Anastasiadou-Christophidou, C. Constantinou, A. Johansson & S. Lundin. 2011. Learning to Eat Strawberries in a Disciplined Way: Normalization Practices Following Organ Transplantati in. Ethnologia Europaea, Vol. 41, Nr. 2, pp. 54-70.  

A. Putnina. 2011. Chapter 6. Managing Trust and Risk in New Biotechnologies: The Case of Population Genome Project and Organ Transplantation in Latvia. In: Robbins, Peter & Huzair, Farah (eds.). 2012. Exploring Central and Eastern Europe’s Biotechnology Landscape. Volume 9 of the series The International Library of Ethics, Law and Technology, pp. 111-129. 

P. Chavot, A. Masseran. 2008. Choisir une technologie, préférer un mode de vie ? Mises en sens des transplantations d’organes [Choose a technology, prefer a lifestyle? Making sense out of organ transplantation]. Éthique et Santé, Vol. 5, Issue 2, pp. 96–102. 

S. Schicktanz, J.W. Rieger, B. Lüttenberg. 2006. Gender Disparity in Living Kidney Transplantation: A Comparison of Global, Mid-European and German Data and their Ethical Relevance. Transplantationsmedizin, Vol. 18, pp. 30-37.

S. Schicktanz, M. Schweda, M. Franzen. 2008. ‘In a completely different light’? – The role of 'being affected' for the epistemic perspectives and moral attitudes of patients, relatives and lay people. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy, Vol. 11, pp. 57-72.

S. Schicktanz, M. Schweda, S. Wöhlke. 2010. Gender issues in living organ donation: medical, social and ethical aspects. In: Klinge, Ineke; Wiesemann, Claudia (eds.): Sex and Gender in Biomedicine. Theories, Methedologies and Results, Göttingen.

S. Beck, K. Amelang. 2010. Comparison in the wild and more disciplined usages of an epistemic practice. In: Thomas Scheffer, Jörg Niewöhner: Thick Comparison. Reviving the Ethnographic Aspiration. Leiden/Boston, Brill, pp. 155–179. 

U. Felt, M. Fochler, A. Mager & P. Winkler. 2008. Visions and Versions of Governing Biomedicine: Narratives on Power Structures, Decision-making and Public Participation in the Field of Biomedical Technology in the Austrian Context. Social Studies of Science, Vol. 38, Issue 2, pp. 233-255.

U. Felt, M. Fochler and P. Winkler. 2010. Coming to Terms with Biomedical Technologies in Different Techno-Political Cultures: A Comparative Analysis of Focus Groups on Organ Transplantation and Genetic Testing in Austria, France and the Netherlands. Science, Technology, & Human Values, Vol. 35, Issue 4, pp. 525-553. 

A. Putnina (2012). Managing Trust and Risk in New Biotechnologies: The Case of Population Genome Project and Organ Transplantation in Latvia. In: Exploring Central and Eastern Europe’s Biotechnology Landscape. Volume 9 of the series The International Library of Ethics, Law and Technology, pp. 111-129.

H. Röcklinsberg. 2009. The Complex Use of Religion in Decisions on Organ Transplantation. J Relig Health, Vol. 48, pp. 62-78. 

den Dikken, A. 2011. Body enhancement: body images, vulnerability and moral responsibility. Utrecht University.

M. Düwell. 2005. Sozialwissenschaften, Gesellschaftstheorie und Ethik. In: Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft und Ethik 10, pp. 5-22.

M. Düwell: Needs, Capacities and Morality. Over Problems of the Liberal to Deal with the Life Sciences. In: M. Düwell et al. (eds.). 2008. The Contingent Nature of Life. Springer Science+Business Media B.V., pp. 119-130. 

N. M. Nijsingh, M. Düwell: Interdisciplinarity, applied ethics and social science research. In: Sollie, Paul, Düwell, Marcus (Eds.). Evaluating New Technologies, Volume 3 of the series The International Library of Ethics, Law and Technology pp 79-92. 

S. Schicktanz. 2007. Why the way we consider the body matters – Reflections on four bioethical perspectives on the human body. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine, Vol. 2, Issue 30, pp. 1-12. 

M. Schweda, S. Schicktanz. 2009. “The Spare Parts Person” – Public Moralities concerning Donation and Disposition of Organs and what Academic Bioethics can learn from them. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine, Vol. 4, Issue 4, pp. 1-10.

S. Beck, K. Amelang. 2010. Comparison in the wild and more disciplined usages of an epistemic practice. In: Thomas Scheffer, Jörg Niewöhner: Thick Comparison. Reviving the Ethnographic Aspiration. Leiden/Boston, Brill, pp. 155–179. 

U. Felt, M. Fochler, A. Mager & P. Winkler. 2008. Visions and Versions of Governing Biomedicine: Narratives on Power Structures, Decision-making and Public Participation in the Field of Biomedical Technology in the Austrian Context. Social Studies of Science, Vol. 38, Issue 2, pp. 233-255.

U. Felt, M. Fochler and P. Winkler. 2010. Coming to Terms with Biomedical Technologies in Different Techno-Political Cultures: A Comparative Analysis of Focus Groups on Organ Transplantation and Genetic Testing in Austria, France and the Netherlands. Science, Technology, & Human Values, Vol. 35, Issue 4, pp. 525-553. 

A. Putnina (2012). Managing Trust and Risk in New Biotechnologies: The Case of Population Genome Project and Organ Transplantation in Latvia. In: Exploring Central and Eastern Europe’s Biotechnology Landscape. Volume 9 of the series The International Library of Ethics, Law and Technology, pp. 111-129.